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August 4 - SepteMBER 2, 2018
Opening Reception: Saturday, August 4, 5:00 - 8pm

Between Black & White from Here to There

CArl E. Hazlewood


"I was a painter for many years,  but more recently, my desire has been to approach abstraction in a fresh way. Most of the work I’ve produced in recent years is extemporaneous, created directly on/off the walls and floors of the gallery using materials sourced from the everyday environment. Easily available, somewhat ephemeral, these offer a multidimensional edge to what is possible for my composite objects..." - Carl E. Hazlewood

About the Artist

Carl E. Hazlewood, born in Guyana, received a BFA (with honors) from Pratt, and an MA from Hunter College. Also a curator and writer, he co-founded Aljira a Center for Contemporary Art in Newark, NJ. Recent honors include residencies and fellowships from The Bogliasco Foundation, Italy; NARS Foundation, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Headlands Center for the Arts, Yaddo, Vermont Studio Center, and the MacDowell Colony, among others. A 2017 ‘Tree of Life Foundation’ award grantee, his fifty-two feet painting installation, ‘TRAVELER’, was commissioned by the Knockdown Center, in Maspeth, Queens, in 2017. Hazlewood’s work has been seen in the NADA, PRIZM, Volta, and Scope Art Fairs. BOMB Magazine and the NY Times are among publications that have written about the artist.

GALLERY HOURS:

Thursday through Sunday, 1pm to 6pm; or by appointment. 

DIRECTIONS:

Take 2, 3, or 4 trains to Franklin Avenue. Walk two blocks against the traffic on Franklin. Walk ¾ block to 558 St. Johns Place. FiveMyles is within easy walking distance from the Brooklyn Museum.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

FiveMyles is in part supported by the New York State Council for the Arts, Public Funds from the New York City Dept. of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, Council Member Laurie Cumbo, the Greenwich Collection, The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, the Shelley and Donald Rubin Foundation. The panel discussion is made possible thanks to a Humanities NY Action Grant.